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. every day here in south africa, until mr. mandela is finally laid to rest. >> a man who changed the world. >>> our ron claiborne has covered nelson mandela extensively throughout the years. >> ron has had many experiences and memories. and is here with a personal take on the story. >> when you cover a story or a person, it requires professional detachment. we're supposed to stand back, observe and report. for nelson mandela, it was difficult for me personally, because something kept getting in the way. the fact that i admired the man deeply. the first time i saw nelson mandela was at yankee stadium in 1990. six months after he had been released from prison. i was in awe, probably we all were. but then he did something that charmed all of us. >> you now know who i am. i am a yankee. >> reporter: as a college student, i read about this man serving a life sentence for fighting against apartheid. i was fired up by the slogan, free mandela. years later, at abc, i traveled to south africa to embezzle his birthplace and qunu, where he you up as a small child. and where he will be burie
johannesburg home. the last black president of south africa called mr. mandela a great man with great integrity. >> i think his greatest legacy to south africa and to the world is the emphasis in which he has always put on the need for reconciliation. >> reporter: the white house says president and mrs. obama as long w-z former president george w. bush and bill clinton plan to attend the memorial event. >>> stpraáp announced their own memorial for nelson mandela. it'll be held in the rotunda and former mayor brown will attend. >>> san francisco animal control today arrested a man suspected of drowning two cat that is belonged to a homeless woman. animal control officers say they arrested lee roy patterson on drum street after a struggle. police say patterson confronted the homeless work last month on pier 15. he threw her belongings right into the bay including her two cats. patterson is now facing two counts of felony animal cruelty and if convicted he could get -p up -- could get up to two years in jail. >>> continuing coverage of the unseasonably cold weather affecting those who make live
president of south africa called mr. mandela a great man with great integrity. >> i think his greatest legacy to south africa and to the world is the emphasis in which he has always put on the need for reconciliation. >> reporter: the white house says president and mrs. obama as long w-z former president george w. bush and bill clinton plan to attend the memorial event. >>> stpraáp announced their own memorial for nelson mandela. it'll be held in the rotunda and former mayor brown will attend. >>> san francisco animal control today arrested a man suspected of drowning two cat that is belonged to a homeless woman. animal control officers say they arrested lee roy patterson on drum street after a struggle. police say patterson confronted the homeless work last month on pier 15. he threw her belongings right into the bay including her two cats. patterson is now facing two counts of felony animal cruelty and if convicted he could get -p up -- could get up to two years in jail. >>> continuing coverage of the unseasonably cold weather affecting those who make live on the streets in san jos
of the most humble people i've ever met. and mr. mandela arrived today, he said to the producer, said to him, what is the subject of today's show? [laughter] [applause] >> if anybody ever earned that our on oprah winfrey, it was nelson mandela. in closing this special report, bill, you worked so many years in the johannes berg -- in the johannesburg bureau. your thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela? >> everybody acknowledges he is an icon and simple and all of that. i think what people tend to overlook and what in my mind made him exceptional among the thering figures of 21st century is he was such an astute politician. you look back over the whole trajectory of his life, he was at one time a lack nationalists, then a non-racialist, he opposed arm struggles, then took up arms struggles, then he dropped arm struggles. he was close partner of the ,outh african communist party and for a year or two was actually member of the communist party, yet as a president he was a close ally of south africa's capitalists. in other words, he was whatever served his purpose. he never lost sight of the b
anticipated that mr. mandela must go some time, that we really remain shocked that it has actually come to pass. i think that it's a shock filled with anxiety about life after nelson mandela. and i believe that every south african, wherever they stood in the apartheid years and wherever they've stood for the last 20 years, are absolutely united in their grief for nelson mandela's departure. and every south african are united, i hope, in the understanding that we need to emulate him. we need to live up to the values and the ideals that he had stood for and that we need to find our better selves in order for us to make us a success of south africa. >> is there love -- love for nelson mandela among white south africans as well? >> i think that there is enormous love. i don't think it started out that way. i think that when he was a prisoner, there was this fear of nelson mandela and the fact that after incarcerating him for 27 years, how angry must he be? how bitter will he be? how vengeful will he be? and in a very real way, he was able to surprise them. and slowly but surely, he began to
told bishop tutu i disagree with you and with mr. mandela because tutu is that way as well. but i respect you. so why can't you guys in the republican party bring that to the the fore? >> well, nelson mandela stood up against a great instice and willing to pay a huge price for that and that's the reason he mourned today because of that struggle that he performed. you are right, what he was advocating for was not necessarily the right answer, but he was fighting against some great injustice. and i would make the argument that, you know, we have a great injustice going on right now in this country with an everincreasing size of government that is taking over and controlling people's lives. and obamacare is front and center in that. i agree with talking points, your points earlier which is the center focus of the 2014 election, mu be obamacare. and all of its aspects and the cool thing about obamacare is it is not only bad for the economy and bad for people's health. it's also bad for freedom of conscience. it's bad on whole variety of issues that will energize all across america. >>
life of. >> robert makes a very important point. yet politics has not been absent in the days since mr. mandela's passing, kate. i think what had happened in some corners of the conservative blogosphere, twittersphere -- i'm not from the 20th century. please don't ask me to use these words. on his facebook page commenters, including this person who couldn't spend his name called him a commune nist involved in torture, terror, murder and they have lost a lot of respect for senator cruz. it's amazing to me the vitriol that exists in parts of american society. people like nelson mandela who should be a hero for everybody the world over and especially here in the united states. >> he was a political person so people are going to have political feelings about him. kudos to senator cruz for what's being said on his facebook and going. he obviously wanted to go. >> which is less about nelson mandela and more about ted cruz. jonathan, in fairness if we're talking about conservatives who are quote, unquote, doing the right thing, newt gingrich called nelson mandela one of the greatest leaders o
, the very same day that o'reilly was calling mr. mandela a communist last night, another fox news personality said about president obama on the same network, now, just hours earlier, listen to this. >> more class warfare, more radical wealth redistribution because this is who he is. he is essentially a statist. he is essentially a socialist. >> socialist, communist. so, i mean, this is almost like talking to sound bites being thrown around purposefully. >> they said the same things about dr. martin luther king jr. we can't judge what the obama presidency will be perceived 20 years from now. my suspicion is that a man that tried to make sure people had access to health care, i don't think they're going to say you know that's a lot like slavery or apartheid. i don't think that's going to be the legend of barack obama that we remember. >> you know, i think that people don't have a sense of how controversial these struggles were and how to fight opposition. i mean, i've been in the civil rights fight for the last several decades. and i remember the beginnings of the fight against apar
in a gathering with mr. mandela. i'll never forget, he said you cannot be afraid to grow and evolve. you have got to be willing to continue to grow, if you're going to be effective, and he grew. you've got to remember there were a lot of nationalist groups that said he had turned soft, sold out. there were a lot of different tensions there. he was able to withstand the hatred and opposition of the african, a whites and he was focused on democracy. >> he was incredibly tenacious in that he had the question of black nationalism versus the question of integration. eugene, you have a great piece and i'll read an exert of it today. we should remember not only the man who embraced his former enemies but also the man who refused to be bowed by those enemies, who remained militant despite 27 years of imprisonment who walked out of jail with his head held high and eyes toward the future. >> we think of nelson mandela and see that smile that's like sunshine. it just lights up anyplace. i only had the experience of meeting him once, it was in '94 and he was already nelson mandela. but before, long before, i
and shaking hands. mr. mandela would not talk to fox news. he wanted and -- well, when i say wanted, he's due to appear in court. he's been taken to court by other members of the family because he illegally dug up members of the family who have deceased and moved them illegally to other xwraifgraves. but he is the person, he is incredibly important to nelson mandela's clan. he's the tribal leader, the chief of the clan, and nelson mandela himself chose him to be his successor in the clan. he was coming here along with other members of the family for a prayer session. i'm just going to ask our cameraman to just ensure i'm going to walk out of shot here so you can see the scene behind me here better. we've been hearing a prayer session here for the just about the last hour with the people of south africa and just the ordinary people of south africa coming here. the scene here is emotional and it is really quite something different even for south africa. >> thank you so much for that update from south africa. of course, we're going to follow the developments over the next several days. >>> now t
church her entire life. >> it's a special mass for mr. mandela. every time he came up from the islands, he would say peace. so that he'll be very pleased. >> reporter: during a struggle against aparthide people used to run to this church when they were trying to hide. there's still bullet holes on the windows. >> we used to run and come to this church to pray to god so that he can come and assist us because we were in trouble during that time. >> reporter: life for his 4- year-old grandson starkly different. and once the seat of the aparthide government, thanks for the man who saved them. >> presence in life meant so much for the african people. allowed them to get rid of their guilt feelings. >> i think everybody loves mandela. but true reconciliation, if it's really, i don't see it every day. >> reporter: but today mandela's death has reminded people of what he stood for and the nation they still need to work to create. >> services at san francisco's gladenn memorial church recall mandela and his long fight against aparthide. >>> joyful singing rang out in the church followed by trib
into south africa, and we went in to have a conversation with mr. mandela. it was a true honor to watch both incredible minds exchanging and talking about both the past and the present. it was a very inspiring moment. you could see in that moment incredible wisdom and at the same time the incredible charm, his smile and laugh that inspired people around the world. >> ambassador gibbs, when you spent time as ambassador to south africa, can you describe how powerful nelson mandela's legend and legacy were were when it came to talking with members of the south african government? >> i think everyone in south africa, from those who knew him personally to those whose lives had been shaped by the legacy he left were so inspired by the example he set. it's a challenge for all of us, and i think the lesson i hope people will take away from his life is that we all can rise above our differences. i think south africa is still working to live up to the incredible example that he set. i think all of us around the world need to live up to that example in a time whether we are divided by political party,
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
to former south african president nelson mandela. he passed away last thursday at the age of 95. mr. mandela serve as south africa's first black president from 1994 to 1999. he spent 27 youth in prison before he was elected president. >> the house will wish to know how we intend to proceed today. defense questions will be postponed to next monday. the present list of questions will be carried over. there will not be another shuffle to the table office will announce consequential changes shortly. this is a special day for special tribute to a special statesmen, nelson mandela. i hope that as many members as possible will be able to contribute. tributes may continue until 10 p.m. there will be no end of day adjournment debate. the house will also wish to know that there will be an event to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of nelson mandela, taking place in westminster hall at 2 p.m. on thursday december 12. i call the prime minister. >> thank you, mr. speaker. nelson mandela was a towering figure in our lifetime, a pivotal figure in the history of south africa and the world,
cows interfere with the winning meant that. mr nelson mandela have put in from the ground while its leaders have expressed sorrow to the loss of an influential courageous anti apartheid icon. this in mind that i was a triumph for justice and the tone for a fisherman inspiration. daniel rode alone one which he introduced by his is set for his stuff. when german eighteen twenty two and three today's gone home. we've lost one of the most influential. courageous whimper from a good human beings that many of us will share time with on this earth he no longer was asked. he belongs to the ages the light. one of the bright just likes of apollo has gone by. nelson mandela was told just to hear it was on top wanna hear it all looks the first president of bubble free south africa the man who suffered so much for freedom and justice the man who threw his dignity. through his trial inspired millions. with all the force of the police and the funny part i with a strong will. nation building he made a major achievement focus on the recon see the apron of the people he was a great leader the darkroo
through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> reporter: after 27 years in prison nelson mandela walked into freedom, against all odds the leader of rebellion against south africa's white apartheid government became the leader of national unity. mandela's decades long rebellion transformed him from a convicted trader into a freedom fighter and international hero. >> i have fought very firmly against apartheid on the nation. >> reporter: mandela was born into approved family. he support -- into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence to bring about change. he became a lawyer and opened the first south african law firm to defend blacks who were forced from their land, but in 1960 mandela turned militant when 69 black protesters were massacred. >> many use fear, but it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence. >> reporter: mandela lived up to his tribal name troublemaker repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentenced to life in prison on south africa's infamous robin island. he wa
one of its great moral leaders. >> despite his long years of captivity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them fir
. warmly welcomed at the white house. >> mr. mandela, a man who embodies the hopes of millions. >> reporter: it was bill clinton with whom he would develop the closest bond. mandela, now president of south africa, visited the white house during the darkest days of the clinton presidency. he gave his friend a boost. >> our morality does not allow us to desert our friends. >> reporter: this friendship clinton treasures to this day. >> we just hit it off. i just adored him. he was always, you know, he was a true friend. >> reporter: mandela, as an ex-president, met with george w. bush in 2005. but there was no love lost there. mandela was one of bush's harshest critics when it came to iraq. when we talked to bush about the ailing mandela earlier this year, there were no hard feelings. >> he promoted freedom. he was a really great leader. he was smart and capable. and made his mark. >> reporter: obama only met mandela once. ever so briefly as a junior senator. but his connection may be the most profound. it was mandela, he says, who awakened him to the wider world. inspiring him to political ac
president, almost from his arrival, he assumed a kind of command the first time his lawyer visz ited him, mr. mandela greeted them and to their amaizment as my code of honor. the authorities began treating him as a prison elder statesman. >> you have to understand, nelson mandela grew up in a house of royalty, the king in his village or in the village next to his was where he grew up. so he had a royal bearing. and i think he commanded respect. and he knew that. he didn't throw it around but he used it when it was important. so i think that, you know, during his time in prison, he did in fact begin to -- even though he may not have realized that he would ever get out of prison, but he took the steps that were necessary both with his comrades and the younger ones and older ones to be in a position to rule if that time ever came. i think this was the faith that eventually they would succeed that kept them all going. >> i want to hear you talk about the reaction you're seeing coming out of south africa to his passing. is the sense of mourning and sense of south africa losing its father figure a
of south africa said the mr. mandela's death is greatest sorrow. this is president speaking of mandela's family. so much our people would be free. very emotional words from the president of south africa. melissa: here is president obama. let's listen in. >> nelson mandela closed statement from the dock saying, i have fought against white domination. and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i hope to live for and to achieve. but if needs be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. today he has gone home and we've lost one of the most influential, courageous an profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and unbending will, to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south
will remember most about mr. mandela that his spirit could not be restrained by economic injustices, metal bars, or the burden of hate and revenge. he taught us forgiveness on a grand scale. he was a spirit born free destined to soar above the rainbows. statement by mohammed ali. i want to bring on nbc's ron allen. he covered nelson mandela's 1994 election, and he's been back to south africa five times since 2011. thank you for being with me tonight. you were there in '94. i was there as an observer, an activist. you as a journalist. i was in the city of johannesbu johannesburg. give people a sense. i understand the greatness of nelson mandela. you have to understand that moment. the african -- the black african had never been able to vote before in south africa. >> right. >> give us a sense of what it was like in durbin in the non-city areas. >> right. this was a very rural area and we were beyond the city. and there were polling places that were essentially huts. and it was a very misty, foggy morning. and i can remember seeing these huts and these lines that stretched for literally for miles
of dignity for the african decent. his long walk to freedom, mr. mandela's constant fight for equality personified what my father often said injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. we showed briefly a second ago in new york city the apollo theatre marquis honors mandela. mayor bookberg announced he'll open a high school in honor of mandela. how much impact do you think mandela's life and times have on the civil rights movement and certainly during '80s and '90s when advocates demanded sanctions against apartheid in south africa. >> how much did it have? >> how much did it raise the credibility? >> tremendously. the fact the united states came on board. fortunately the united states came on board. it might have been a little late some would say. if you looked at other country they had come on board much earlier. what the united states did, students and universities started to say we want to divest our holdings in south africa. that was huge. when you impact a nation economically, then the community has to pay attention. business had to pay attention and say maybe these pol
things as mr. mandela did for his people. that was my point. ron from pennsylvania. st. nicholas was a greek bishop serving in turkey. the statement was his association with christmas began in holland. juan gutierrez, el paso, texas. we saw the santa predicament by telling our daughter he works for jesus. michael from virginia. bill, i figured out a way to get my mail read. mention the bolder, fresher tour. bingo, mike. we'll see you in charleston friday, march 28. knoxville saturday, march 29. tickets sell fast. get them while we have them. they make great christmas gifts. 50 tickets left in san diego for the february 21 show. nick from wooim.reilly.com. i'm the freshman class president and enjoy your books. i have benefitted from your leadership. i appreciate that. merry christmas. happy holidays to everyone there. finally the factor tip of the day, saving you money again. you know, we don't like to endorse big companies. it's not what we are here to do. however, if you become a prime member on amazon.com, you get big discounts on everything they sell. it costs $79 a year but y
are under way following mandela's death thursday night. he was 95 years old. mr. mandela's body is being prepared now for his lying in state. that will happen late they are week. on tuesday, there will be an official memorial service, then there will be a state funeral on sunday in the village where he grew up. >>> number four, mexican police have recovered stolen radioactive material and are grilling six men who may be connected to the theft. the men tested negative for any poisoning from that material. they're now in police custody. mexican authorities say they've recovered all of the lost cobalt-60 material, but they've been tight-lipped about whether they've made any arrests in the broader case. >>> services will be held today in hawaii to mark the 72nd anniversary of the japanese attack on pearl harbor. lots of veterans and survivors are angry that the traditional missing-man flyover, you saw one there, has been cancelled this year. because of military budget constraints. >>> blockbuster jobs report for november. >> yeah. >> and it could not have come at a better time really for pre
to be with you. >> we see just in the live shot from there, people are celebrating mr. mandela's life and the impact that he made on all of us, but you're looking at the sheer number of people. there's no reason for us to expect there would be any violence, keeping the area secure with 95,000 people half the world leaders in this open air stadium is an incredible sikt as ron pointed out. >> it's an extremely complex undertaking. close to 100 heads of state and government attending and each of those leaders comes a delegat n delegation -- as he alluded to with regards to the stadium, obviously, security concerns that the south african and other security officials will be forced to deal with. >> politico is reporting shortly after the announcement on thursday that nelson mandela passed away, secret service and american military personnel were en route to prepare for president obama's arrival here. what would you compare this to in events that you worked on? the first thing for me that came in mind watching the pope in south america earlier this year, wherefore whatever reason the motor
in london. and two of his young daughters, mr. mandela's daughters were there and found out their father had passed during the premiere and they wanted you to continue showing the film. >> yeah. you know, it was an awful time. we did an opening, we spoke to the audience. i spoke personally about my dad who just passed and i based my character on -- i based his personality on my dad. and, you know, literally half an hour, 45 minutes into the film the news broke in amongst the cinema. and justin and myself and the producers, we went outside to sort of figure out what to do next, because it was awful. everyone was so in shock. and they said just keep going. let the film keep going. and then, you know, once the film, the credits started rolling, we went back on stage and we announced it. >> i want to play a clip from the film. in this scene, idris, you play a young mandela who goes to a theater and interrupts the movie to encourage people to fight apartheid. let's take a look. >> she is good looking, but you must give me sophia loren any day. we are the people of this nation but we don't have po
has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> mandela emerged from behind bars to resume his campaigns. but tribal animosity and political division erupted. the bloody birth pangs. and there were personal problems, but nothing could deter mandela in his quest for racial equality. >> for our personal freedom. >> his work was recognized with a nobel peace prize as south africa's first black president, mandela remained a humble man. taking delight in a new york ticker tape parade, dancing at a convert in his honor, meeting with world leaders and his hero. as promise, he stepped down from president of south africa after serving one term. >> south africa has been a state to almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela's legacy stands against him. that is one of the best and most optimistic qualities that he hands to the people of south africa. >> and he admired a young senator, barack obama, as he stood in his prison cell. years later, he met mrs. obama and her daughters. by all accounts, the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. he
of the united states,. the photograph was taken when mandela visited washington in 2005. and mr. obama was then a brand-new united states senator from illinois. here was mr. obama's reaction late today to the death. >> we have lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. through his dignity and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. >> pelley: president obama used the word modiba an honorary tightle that translates at father. major garrett at the white house tells us this evening mr. obama plans to attend the state funeral in south africa. that is likely to be in about ten days. nelson mandela will be remembered as a man who emerged from a tiny village to become a defining figure of our time. he was born on july 18th, 1918 in a village called mvezo. his mother named him holy sashava meaning troublemaker, but later a teacher renamed him nelson. he moved to johannesburg at 2
. >> i was there at the right time. i had the privilege to cook mr nelson mandela's first meal out of imprisonment. they were there to discuss negotiations for his relief. >> 3 o'clock in the afternoon there was a lot of strange characters with weapons, checking you out, making sure that the food that your people taste the food. >> the meal itself was simple. the south african version with mixed berries. >> what's it like for you to create this? >> this is the most important meal i have cooked in my life. it shows freedom, it shows forgiveness and for me it's an emotional and special meal and day for me. >> once the food had gone out marquets said he was able to sneak a peak. >> i had a chance to get out and look and show him. he looks very relaxed. same demeanour, same beautiful smile that he had and forgiving. that is the picture that i saw and the forgiveness in his eyes. >> simply but special. >> simply meal, permanent inference. >> so it was just, you know, an unbelievable experience. once every century you'll see a man like nelson mandela who can change the world. it was a be
.org and thrive. >>> there is mr. monodell la, mr. nelson mandela, a freeman taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> extraordinary moment, nelson mandela freed after 27 years in captivity. four years later, the first black president in south africa stepping down after five years. his retirement was busy working for world rights, world peace and working for aids and charity. richard branson joins me. richard, you knew nelson mandela over the course of many years and worked on nonprofits together. his sense of compassion to me is something i always found extraordinary, his ability to not have hate in his heart for those who oppressed not on him but generations of black south africans. >> it was absolutely remarkable, and i think something that other nations should learn by. i mean, 27 years in prison, not just himself but hundreds of black activists, many people like steven b. comb, you know, killed horribly and decide to forgive those people, and they set up truth and reconciliation courts where those people have to come to apologize to the relatives of those people that they might h
nelson mandela. > >> your realtime captioner is mrs. linda m. macdonald >>> tributes are pouring out around the world for nelson mandela. a look back at what granted a bay area a visit from the leader. >> and the game changing break in a cold case that led police to a suspect nearly 20 years after a bay area teen's disappearance. >> freezing temperatures and a storm we'll talk about that coming up. >> the roads look good heading into and out of san francisco but some of our travel times ar building. >>> i'm michelle griego. >> hi, everyone. i'm frank mallicoat. it's nearly 5:30. kiet do is freezing in san jose right now. tgif, kiet! >> reporter: enjoying use that term loosely. there's not a lot of frost to knock off your car but check it out. it's actually coming off pretty easy just a light brushing with your hand. it's not going to be so bad going to work. for some businesses, though, the cold weather is profitable. >> the temperature is dropping and that means cold, hard cash. at pelican rocking in walnut creek sweaters are selling briskly. >> sales jumped over 500% on sweaters an
overlapped. when mr. clinton got caught up in scandal mandela visiting the white house stood by him saying our morality does not allow us to desert our friends. recently we asked mr. clinton about their special bond. >> you met with nelson mandela more than any president. and i wonder what was your relationship in those days? >> well, we became good friends. i met him, ironically in 1992 i met him at the democratic convention in new york when i was being nominated for president. we had business to do. they were one of the countries that voluntarily gave up their nuclear arsenal. and in the process of that we became good personal friends. we used to do business together on the phone where their time difference was so great i would take the call at night. and it wasn't too late mandela would make me go get chelsea every time he called and he would talk to her and ask her if she was doing her homework. he was an enormous help to me during every difficult time i had as president. and he did it all, interestingly enough while he never stopped being president of south africa. so if his country h
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
the timing might be? there is a memorial service also a funeral. mr. mandela is also lying in state. and will the president invite former u.s. presidents to accompany him? >> thank you for those questions. i should have noted that for those of you that did not hear the president speak in the wake of the news of president mandela's death, i will point you to those remarks. all i can say is that president obama and the first lady will go to south africa next week to pay their respects to the memory of nelson mandela and participate in memorial events. at this point, i don't have more information on logistics. timing of the travel. that is all being worked out. in terms of others who are going to make that trip, i would refer to them at this time. we will have more information. fairly to have it quickly and when we do we will be able to provide it to you. to others whether they go, but would the president invite them to travel? point i don't want to get ahead of a process that is being worked on as i speak in timing ande logistics for the whole trip. when we have that information we wi
. mr. obama said of mandela what was said of another great emancipator, abraham lincoln: "he belongs to the ages." mandela's legacy, the president said, is a free south africa at peace with itself, an example to the world. for cbs news, i'm scott pelley. good night. captioning sponsored by cbs captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, [ female announcer ] for those who love sweets your season is here. let's just call it the baking time of year. you need special ingredients. you need the staples for homemade. you need safeway sugar for just a buck eighty-eight. and that magic thing that makes everyone want another only two ninety-nine and when hands get messy, quite surely they'll say, yum! wow! yay! what a sweeter holiday. safeway. ingredients for life.
of mr. mandela's health. remind the viewers of what president obama did when he went to south africa several months ago? >> well, again, i wasn't on that trip, but there was oncern, some talk even then. nelson mandela was in failing health at that time. that perhaps his visit to south africa could coincide with nelson mandela, his illness. he didn't go visit directly with nelson mandela at the time. their two lives, given their places in history, have intersected somewhat. we are waiting to hear what president obama says about nelson man tele. would not be surprised to have him appear on camera to discuss his legacy not only in south africa, but in the united states. there is a new movie out now about nelson mandela and his journey from an activist at the african national congress, to his imprisonment, his release and his rise to lead south africa, the incredible rise to lead south africa. no word exactly on what the president can say or when real hear something from president obama. i would think it would be in the not too distance future. not long ago the president himself was in a
by the french president, francois hollande, which will pay to do to nelson mandela. the order has been changed because the head of the south african delegation, the foreign minister, will be speaking, as will the president of the african union commission, who happens to also be south african. mrs. zuma will be talking about nelson mandela. there will be probably a minute of silence. the french president also announcing that he will attend the funeral of nelson mandela in south africa. i have talked to several presidents this morning who all paid tribute to nelson mandela and said there was a need for them to do their best for the toure of africa as a tribute nelson mandela. >> once the leaders get down to business, what exactly is the goal of the summit? >> the goal of the summit, according to the french president, is to make sure that africans can handle their own security, which means better armies, better coordination, better intelligence sharing. this is a tall order because just as leaders are gathering, french troops are being deployed in the central african republic. this shows how much
of them -- not just -- i mean, in one sense, dad, because he was killed early, became an iconic figure. mr. mandela, over time, after he came out of jail, became iconic and once he became the president of the country. >> and he was particularly meaningful in your family. i think in your mom's kitchen -- >> yeah. >> -- there are family pictures, or there had been family pictures and the one non-family member of a photograph in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us
and soweto. different creeds and colors honoring the same man as father. >> this is a special mass for mr. mandela. >> reporter: tears and keers capturing the love for father as south africans called mandela. the greatest memorial may be the faces, black and white together, parents bring children who will live a life madiba made possible. >> they were born free in south africa. they experience all the fruit. >> reporter: which pride and legacy, there is also lochlts one man has mandela's image on his car and says he hasn't been able to sleep or eat sense he heard the news. >> how can i live without madiba? i'm so sad. >> reporter: the long good bye will continue all week, adding to the legend and legacy of nelson mandela. you know on friday they had a ceremony for nelson mandela, a traditional african one where they closed his eyes. wherever he is, i hope his ears are opened, to hear this, this is what they say would be the greatest memorial for fell nnel mandela, living apart. that's what's going on right now as a buildup to tomorrow t. kind of sendoff and a memorial we haven't seen. 90,
, there is a response from his office, which is mr. mandela deserves to be remembered and honored for his sacrifices in pursuit of freedom, for the oppressed and his historic achievements to that end. that's from a spokeswoman, ka katherine frazier. he's aware there has been a negative response from some conservatives. he got similar not as negative, but some negative response when he supported the gillibrand amendment that had to do with sexual assault in the military, a complicated bill we can talk about at another time, but he also got brush back from conservatives on that. >> we'll watch you tackle this and other stories coming up in five minutes. i'll let you go. jake tapper on "the lead." thank you very much. >>> have you seen this video? i know you're all tweeting what happens to the video. we will tell you, next. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo,
that is emanating from there. i have to say that i read with a chuckle about the first time that you met mr. mandela back in 1990. i want you to tell people because you were literally star struck. >> i absolutely was. i've been blessed to be around some phenomenal people, some great leaders, but there's no one like nelson mandela. so yes, the first time i was in his company was immediately after we had organized a glorious ticker tape for him parade down broadway in manhattan. we took him into city hall in new york, and had found myself alone with him in the mayor's office. and i didn't realize that i had been just staring at the man for probably ten minutes till i heard a voice say, excuse me, young man. can i trouble you for that glass of water. i realized that he had probably asked me several times for some water after being out in the heat and this long parade. i raced, got him the water and darn near spilled it all over him, i was so incredibly nervous and in awe of him. even though when you were around him, you were in awe, there was something about him that will created an accessibility, too.
, president obama will be among the mourners along with mrs. obama who met mandela shortly after becoming first lady. president bush and laura bush have been invited to travel with the obamas, and former president clinton and hillary clinton will travel to the tribute for nelson mandela. from south africa we hear from one of his friends who described those final visits with the man he revered. abc's byron pitts from outside mandela's home. >> reporter: nowhere has admiration for nelson mandela been stronger, expressed more passionately than a few feet from his doorstep outside his home where the beloved statesman took his last breath. >> by singing and dancing, it's a way of showing our appreciation. >> he represents this country. >> reporter: nelson mandela will be laid to rest in grand style. tuesday, a memorial service like the world has never seen. some 95,000 people packed inside the stadium. wednesday through friday the former president will lay in state in pretoria, the nation's legislative capital. next sunday mandela will be laid to rest in the small village of his boyhood on the
interviewer. he said, mr. mandela, about the communists, and madiba said, well, they were the only ones that helped had us, next question. >> interesting. >> and moved right ahead. >> you afforded him a ticker tape parade down the canyon of heroes, which was reserved for very few. that's like amelia earhart, john glen, jesse owens. that was extraordinary. did he understand the significance of that? did he get it? >> oh, yes. he was a very wise man, and he understood the significance. later when we had a gathering at yankees sta yankees stadium, it must have been 60,000, 70,000 people. i put the yankee jacket around his shoulders and the cap, and he looked out at the crowd and said, now you know who i am. i am a yankee. and that went around the world. george steinbrenner was so impressed he said, i'll pay for it. >> you know that was impressive he was going to put out for that. how about the reception in harlem? what was that like? >> it was amazing. he spoke at 125th and lenox avenue, the site from which people like malcolm x and martin luther king and many had spoken earlier. here's th
admirerers are mourning the passing of nelson mandela -a pact was felt arou >>> your realtime captioner is mrs. linda m. macdonald. >>> world leaders and millions of admirers are mourning the passing of nelson mandela, a man whose impact was felt around the globe including right here in the bay area. good afternoon, i'm michelle griego. a day after the death of nelson mandela, much of the world has paused to reflect on his legacy and also his accomplishments. cbs reporter tara mergener is live in washington with more. >> reporter: mandela was an international icon. today millions are mourning his passing and celebrating his remarkable life. the flag is after half-staff at the south african embassy in washington. outside his home in johannesburg, mourners are gathering to remember the man they called madiba. a memorial service will be held tuesday and the outpouring of love says something with the caliber of the man who led the country out of apartheid. >> we'll always love madiba for teaching us that it is possible to overcome hatred and anger to build a new nation. >> reporte
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